Shows: February 27, 2007

Photo for 'Lost and Found:  Reclaiming the Japanese American Incarceration'
 

Lost and Found: Reclaiming the Japanese American Incarceration

Internment or incarceration? War relocation camps or concentration camps? These questions and more were raised by the Japanese American National Museum's groundbreaking exhibition, American's Concentration Camps: Remembering the Japanese American Experience. We will be joined in the studio by KAREN L. ISHIZUKA, curator of the critically-acclaimed exhibition and author of a new book, Lost and Found: Reclaiming the Japanese American Incarceration , that both documents the substance of the exhibition and the process of revelation and relclamation that unfolded as former inmates and visitors confronted the experience of the camps.

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Education Roundtable: Do Small Schools leave NYC Immigrant Youth Behind?

Next, we host an EDUCATION ROUNDTABLE focused on the small school movement and immigrant youth. For the past few years, large failing high schools in New York City have been dismantled and reborn as new small schools. These small schools are supposed to offer a more personalized learning experience and more rigorous curriculum, but some advocates argue that the schools leave English language learners behind. We will be joined in the studio by of the JOSE DAVILA of New York Immigration Coalition, VANESSA LEUNG of the Center for Asian Children and Families and longtime small school teacher, BEN HONOROFF.

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Web Exclusive! The Closing of Brooklyn's Lafayette High

STEVE CHUNG discusses the troubled background of Lafayette High School in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, where approximately 40% of the students are Asian American. A history of violence at the school has led to declining enrollments, and, says Chung, incidents of physical harassment of Asian American students have resulted in at least one criminal prosecution. Despite this, Chung maintains that race relations were improving last December, when Mayor Bloomberg announced plans to shutter the institution and replace it with a series of smaller schools. Chung's subsequent proposal for an International High School was rejected by the Board of Education, which plans instead to open three small "theme" schools, none of which would itself meet the educational needs of the surrounding Asian communities. In this interview, Chung outlines the necessity of bilingual education for immigrant students and why a failure to provide crucial services will lead to higher dropout rates among an already vulnerable population.

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This program is brought to you by Chitra Aiyar and Leyla Mei of the APF collective.

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