Shows: July 15, 2008

Photo for 'ICED, Anti-Deportation Video Game Created by Breakthrough'
ICED

Protests Against US Beef Imports to South Korea

It is reported that more than a million have taken part in protests against South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, due to a treaty allowing US beef imports into the country. US beef imports to South Korea were blocked in 2003 because of a fear of mad cow disease. The protests eventually led to a call for President Lee's impeachment. While the media has covered the protests as being the catalyst to requests for President Lee's resignation, for many protesting the US beef import issue is just the last straw in many problems with the current administration in South Korea. Tonight to we talk to professor Bruce Cumings about the current situation in South Korea.

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ICED, Anti-Deportation Video Game Created by Breakthrough

Last February Breakthrough, an international human rights organization, launched a new video game entitled ICED. ICED stands for I Can End Deportation, a play on the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Department, which is responsible for detentions, deportations and raids on immigrants and undocumented migrants in the US. In the game the player's goal is to avoid getting caught and going to detention by doing good deeds and knowing the facts about current immigration laws. The hope is to create awareness and spark dialogue about unfair US immigration policies. We speak to Executive Director of Breakthrough, Mallika Dutt about the video game, ICED.

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Vijay Prashad on his book, The Darker Nations

The Third World was a project, not a place. That's the premise of Vijay Prashad's newest book, a fascinating reconstruction of the movement of the world's poor countries to establish an alternative global order during the era of the Cold War. Led by post-colonial titans like Nehru, Nasser, and Nkrumah, newly liberated societies joined forces to put forward an incredibly ambitious global programóbefore it all came crashing down. APF's own Andrew Hsiao edited The Darker Nations, recently released in paperback, so we'll re-air this chat between author and editor.

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This program is brought to you by Andrew Hsiao and Silky Shah of the APF collective.

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